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in sight. i'm bill hemmer. the team is back together this morning. martha: did you have a great week? bill: when is it not a great week in august? martha: the fire is a huge story. 3,000 firefighters are on the front lines battling what's called the rim fire. it's 7% contained. strong winds are expected to fan those flames. not a good situation. rescue officials say 4,500 homes and businesses are in harm's way as the flames edge closer to civilization. people in that area obviously very frightened. >> i'm trying to keep my kids calm and not have them too worried about what's going on up there. >> you can actually see planes from our house now. hopefully it doesn't go there. so far it's safe. bill: what have you learned about that, dominic? >> reporter: 15,000 acres have been burnt bad. the white wolf area popular with campers have been closed down. 13 camps have been burnt to the crowd. one campground school for 50 years. we also understand that the central valley could be experiencing some smoke. the central valley of yosemite is the most iconic of all national parks in the united states
decision. martha: the ships in the mediterranean are loaded with tomahawk missiles. they could be launched from those warships in the eastern mediterranean. they have speeds of 550 miles an hour. they can hit targets 1,000 miles away, and they very well may be employed if this does get underway. bill: how involved should the u.s. be in syria. log on, tell us what you think. 44% say get out completely. 36% say only humanitarian aid. 11% support the u.s. giving weapons to the rebels. ambassador john bolton with what the u.s. should do now. martha: jack lew alerting congress the national credit card is almost maxed south again. he says come october we'll not be able to pay our bills unless we raise the at the country can borrow. the white house is warning of a possible financial crisis if we can't borrow any more. stuart, what do you make of this? >> here we go again. treasury secretary lew says we'll only have $50 billion in the bank cash on hands. we spend $9 billion every day. so $50 billion is far too close for comfort. president obama says he's not going to negotiate on this. he wants a
in syria. we all await his decision as does the world. martha: we have new reports from the "wall street journal" that the white house is moving quickly on this because they have reason to believe syria is planning to launch another chemical attack in the country's largest city aleppo. wait wants to accomplish with action. molly henneberg is live at the white house leading our coverage. what is the white house saying? >> the u.s. has to get involved because the world community cannot leave a chemical attack or chemical attacks plural unanswered. but the white house says the goal is not to out of syrian president bashar al-asaad. even though the obama administration believes this is not the only chemical weapons attack by the regime this year. >> the options being considered by the president and his national security team are not around the question of whether chemical weapons were used in syria on a massive scale causing death and injury to innocents women and children. its many not whether they are responsible, it's what is the he appropriate response to this clear violation of internat
. [ laughter ] see you. martha: a chilling story out of oklahoma. two teenagers charged with murder, a third with accessory. 22-year-old christopher lane on a baseball scholarship in oklahoma, he's from australia. the teenagers admit they did it. listen as they try to save this young man. >> they are on the way. they can't company faster. martha: we have more on that 911 call. we are going to talk about this story. it's compelling and very unnerving. gregg: a military judge says she'll announce sentence for bradley manning this morning. her decision expected about an hour and a half from now. bradley manning was convicted of giving hundreds of thousands of classified documents to wikileaks while he worked as an intelligence analyst in iraq. the 20-year-old facing up to 90 years in prison. the prosecutor asking for at least 60 years. manning apologizing for what he has done and he asked for the judge's mercy because he had a difficult childhood. martha: new details on the nsa surveillance program. the "wall street journal" says the nsa can spy on 75 per of all internet traffic. gregg: 75% of
-bye, everybody. nice to be with you. martha: thanks, you guys. well, dramatic 911 call that turned what could have been a mass school tragedy into peaceful outcome. what a story this is today. we're now hearing exactly how a school bookkeeper came face-to-ce with a mad gunman. there was a scene of panic as everybody ran out of that school. she talked him off the ledge. she talked him into surrender. much good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum here in "america's newsroom." what a story this is. gregg: incredible courage. i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. listen to the hero of this story. her name is antoinette toff. she came face-to-face with the shooting suspect, michael brand done hill. >> oh i'm in the front office. he went outside to start shooting. [gunfire] can i run? >> can you get somewhere safe? >> yeah. i got to go. and he's coming back. >> put the phone down. >> okay. she said she is getting police to tell him to back off for you, okay? >> tell them to stop all movement. >> okay. okay. >> stop all movement now on the ground. stop all movement on the ground. he said don't
morning to you, martha, in new york. martha: i'm martha maccallum live in "america's newsroom" this morning. several countries are standing against the syrian regime saying they want to take action and now britain and france are saying they may hold off on their decision until the united nations finishes their work. president obama says is short strike he believes will be effective. >> if we're saying in a clear and decisive but very limited way, we send a shot across the bow staying stop doing, that can have a positive impact on our national security over the long term. bill: molly henneberg leads our coverage live on the north lawn. poly, there will be more meetings today there, but this one is with leaders from congress, and what do we know about that meeting today? >> reporter: the president will two more in depth what the white house is saying all week. that this was a chemical attack they believe, that the u.s. can not let it go unanswered and the president is expected to lay out to congressional leaders his options and classified intelligence behind these options. there
." martha: big one. bill: shocker. are you surprised? i'm thoroughly stunned. martha: you wonder what the next shoe to drop is. i'm martha maccallum. the nsa reportedly intercepted calls from americans on american soil. many times they say it was by accident. sometimes an area code was a mix-up between egypt and washington, d.c. but either way, when these mistakes were made, although we've been told that the government tried to be as transparent as possible, nobody was told that those mistakes were made and the information that we got in this report from the "washington post" last night comes from edward snowden, the man who leaked the initial information about the nsa program and now has temporary asylum in russia. bill: funny how that works, huh? senior white house foreign affairs correspondent wendell goler is on vacation with the president at martha's vineyard. actually wendell's working. the president is on vacation. what's the white house saying about this, wendell? >> reporter: the white house appears to have been blindsided by this sorry. officials are referring reporters to t
into the public sector as well. good morning, everybody, i'm martha maccallum in "america's newsroom." gregg: i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. obamacare provides many employers to provide coverage to anyone who works at least 30 hours a week. but to get around that, some employers are just cutting back on the hours this report coming just days after ups announced it will not provide coverage to husbands and wives of employees who can get insurance on their own. martha: ups is not alone in this. many employers fear they will not be able to afford it. some saying they still don't know what's in the law. this is years after it was signed into law and nancy pelosi famously said this. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it away from the fog of the controversy. martha: the truth is, we are still finding out what's in it, stuart. companies are still scratching their heads saying we're not really sure how this will affect us and what it will cost us. stuart is the host of "varney & company" on the fox business network. what do you make of this latest news? >> it is chan
forgotten, was it a chemical attack. is this the end of the arab spring? our martha raddatz is there. >>> and this is not your typical sports car, going from zero to 60 in seconds. and it may even be the safest car in america. we hit the road with the man on a mission to change the way we drive forever. >>> and come under fire. >>> stand down now! >> how a brave mother stopped the gunman, just the latest heroic woman to diffuse the violent situation. keep it right here, america. "nightline" is back in just 60 >>> this time, it appears deadly chemical weapons were used. potentially one of the worst war atroc atrocities in recent memory. our chief global correspondent martha raddatz was there. as a note to our viewers, this report includes a very disturbing and graphic image. >> reporter: the bodies sprawled across clinic floors, many of the victims children and even infants. others fighting for life, rescue crews trying to help them. victims frantically trying to get air, their bodies showing no other signs of injuries. no blood. >> the convulsions, we see a number of people, babies,
.c. annie grower, a contributor to the see the people blog on the washington post website and martha burke, the money editor of ms. magazine and producer and host of "equal time with martha burke." you look too young to have been there. lynn, i want to ask you what did being there on that important day 50 years ago mean to you as an african-american woman? >> on that day 50 years ago, it was just the most amazing experience i'd ever had in my 16 years. you have to look at it in retrospect, we sometimes see things that you didn't see then, and you have to remember that at the point the people converged on washington, we as a community were off of a very hard fought battle in birmingham, in albany george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again
atrocities in recent memory. our chief global correspondent martha raddatz was there. as a note to our viewers, this report includes a very disturbing and graphic image. >> reporter: the bodies sprawled across clinic floors, many of the victims children and even infants. others fighting for life, rescue crews trying to help them. victims frantically trying to get air, their bodies showing no other signs of injuries. no blood. >> the convulsions, we see a number of people, babies, pinpointing the people -- gurgling is usually consistent with a type of nerve agent. >> reporter: the rebel say that syrian troops fired rockets on these innocents, rockets carrying poisionous gas, they deny it was used, calling the claims baseless. but this weapons expert says that the video shows clear signs. >> the only explanation i can really see is this looks like this fellows nerves are being destroyed potentially by something like sarin. >> reporter: if verified, this would be one of the worst chemical attacks in decades, the syrian opposition claiming over a thousand killed, but the estimates vary. wh
spending the day at martha's kitchen, it's that good work and easy work are far from the same thing. and something jose garcia can demonstrate for you with a meat slicer and a few dozen pounds of roast pork. >> i've been on it for about an hour and a half, and i've got about 45 minutes still. >> reporter: that still is a lot of sliced meat, but the folks at martha's kitchen are going to need it not to mention the 00s of potatoes and gallons of soup to go with t because when they open their doors later this day, 300 people are going to come through them, looking for a meal. it's a drill that is practiced twice a week at this location, san jose's sacred heart church, yet, still is only a frack shun of what they do around here. thanks in large part to the influence of martha's kitchen's executive director. after a career at high tech firms like ibm, apple and hp, shy got some bad news back in the early part of the last decade. >> what i thought was a devastating event of my life, when i got laid off, it was actually a blessing. >> reporter: a blessing, because she says while she always
. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwilling to militarily intervene in syria, despite the deaths of more than 100,000 people and a vow he made more than one year ago. >> that's a red line for us. and that there would be enormous consequences if we start
martha raddatz is in the region for us tonight. >> reporter: it's a terrible and urgent task. tonight the u.s. and u.n. racing to find out whether chemical weapons killed these men, women and children and just how many died. today a shocking new number from opposition groups revealed in washington. >> the most recent estimates we've seen range from 1,000 to 1800 which is obviously a broad range. >> reporter: the assad regime says the claims that it carried out a chemical attack are baseless. but the world is reacting swiftly and forcefully. as u.n. investigators beg for access to the site, the evidence may be quickly dissipating. david, tonight president obama has directed the intelligence community to do everything possible to find additional information about this suspected attack, but we don't know what the u.s. response would be. david? >> martha raddatz with us again tonight. thank you. >>> also new word this evening on americans now believed to have joined the fight on the ground in syria potentially helping terrorist groups there. could those americans, in fact, pose a threat t
are emphasizing for people in real life. martha stewart is often perceived as a woman who is too aggressive and not nice, and even the "b" word used to describe her. and that's totally a gender stereotype. if you had martha stewart as a man, she wouldn't be considered a good business person, and the lens through which people saw different. >> bill, as i was growing up in my adult years there was a snobbery about television, and people wore a badge of honor in the fact that they didn't have a tv set. and you said you were one of those people, but now you've changed your tune, and have written about it, saying that tv may be the signature cultural achievement of america in the 21st century. >> in the last couple of decades, i think it's unquestionable. and that's your point about the emmys and stuff. even if breaking bad gets 20% of the viewers that seinfeld did, it says something about our society when the great artists are working out these problems, right? so you go back to tony soprano, and this is the man who is shot through the legs of a nude female statue, so he's dealing with his wife
, but who gave that order and would this draw america into another conflict? abc's martha raddatz is in egypt tonight covering the region and the question, what happens now? >> reporter: after coming under repeated sniper fire, u.n. investigators donned helmets and bulletproof vests today and returned to the damascus suburbs to interview survivors of the horrific attack. this is the effect of chemicals, one doctor told the investigators, and tonight the u.s. secretary of state said the u.s. has little doubt that it is true. >> make no mistake, president obama believes there must be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. >> reporter: images from the attack are hard to watch. secretary kerry spoke about the hundreds, maybe thousands of innocents who were killed. >> as a father, i can't get the image out of my head of a man who held up his dead child, wailing while chaos swirled around him, the images of entire families dead in their beds without a drop of blood or a visible wound, bodies contorting in spasm
the crisis in syria and we begin with abc's chief global affairs correspondent, martha raddatz, with what the white house says are reasons something must be done. >> reporter: in the situation room this morning, the president's national security team huddled to discuss options in syria, and this afternoon, his secretary of state presented the most forceful case for a military strike to date. >> what we choose to do or not do, matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things. we need to ask, what is the risk of doing nothing? >> reporter: calling syria's president a thug and murderer who gassed his own people while they slept. kerry laid out detailed human intelligence, satellite tracking that showed rocket trajectory, communications intercepts and orders to syrian troops. >> we know that the syrian regime elements were told to prepare for the attack by putting on gas masks and taking precautions associated with chemical weapons. >> reporter: but it's the images and the stories from the survivors that are clearly the most compelling. and that number. 1,429. 1,42
for us. let me start with you, martha and ask you about the president's decision. we saw what happened in parliament yesterday, and david cameron, we know if we go, we go without the support of other countries, maybe france, that's it at the moment. martha, what kind of gamble is the president taking by waiting until congress comes back, debates and weighs in. >> well, i was surprised at what he said today, and giving this tell graphing of time. i think the congress should have been called back on the 22nd of september, the day after we knew that it happened. there are three concerns that we have very quickly. we've got to be sure that they aren't moving these chemical weapons, those are things we need to be aware of. we need to be assure that israel doesn't get attacked. finally, we really don't know what russia is going to do. and they have tried to play the good cop bad cop while they've been supporting hezbollah. there's a lot of questions that need to be asked, i don't think tell graphing the times is the best way to do it. >> this is not really a barm issue. this is an issue, and
and political will. we'll have more from washington in a few moments. but first back to the region, martha. >> thanks, jon. let's bring in colonel steve, a veteran fighter pilot who flew missions in the gulf war and was a deputy secretary of state. welcome, colonel. let's get to the question about the cruise missile strikes. the white house said there will be no boots on the ground. how would these work out of the mediterranean? >> there are a couple ways it could be done. one is by launching them from ships at sea out in the eastern mediterranean or from submari submarines. it's a long, 20-foot sort of flying torpedo, and has wings and a little jet engine that allows it to fly at low altit e altitudes over the sea. it can fly through mountain canyons and hit with accuracies where you can pick third window on the left. that is good. but we have to remember they're small warheads, and not a lot of these missiles. right up front, if it's low-risk, we're going to be prescribed in the amount of military force we can apply. >> one of the things we have talked to people about, is there might be
, martha raddatz. martha, we're hearing that they're ready to go alone. but hoping to put together some time of coalition. >> reporter: they are. time is running out, george. the president wishes he didn't have to go it alone. but he's entirely willing to do that. we have the warships, and cruise missiles, and a fifth destroyer packed with cruise missiles in the mediterranean. >> so much signaling now that it will be a strike. that's giving the syrians warnings and plenty of ability to prepare and counter that. >> reporter: there's reports out of syria, that the syrian regime is moving important people, experts, out of important buildings and airfields. and reports they are bringing busloads of other people in. that might mean they would have images of dead people they would say were caused by the bombs. or try to use them as human shields. which probably wouldn't work. >> the other big question, what kind of retaliation should the united states and the west expect in the event of a syrian strike? and you just came from israel, which is clearly going to be one of the first targets. >> r
martha raditz tells us what this could mean for the united states. >> evidence of a chemical attack in syria is mounting. new images showing the horror. the president spent the day huddled behind closed doors with his national security team, weighing the evidence and has military options. >> we are still gathering information about this particular event, but it is very troublesome. >> among the options on the table, targeting syrian military or government buildings cruise missiles. four navy warships are in the area with tomahawk missiles. u.s. fighter jets could also attack, firing from outside syrian airspace so pilots would be out of harm's way. >> the administration has been very forthcoming in saying that risk must be low. we cannot risk getting servicemen and women hurt, and we don't want to get pulled into another quagmire in the middle east. >> nothing will happen until the u.s. confirms the chemical attack. syrian state tv claims the rebels were behind the attack. abandoning the position that no chemical attack occurred. u.n. officials in syria are pushing for access to the
in the middle east. he will be more on "this week." martha raddatz is co-anchoring. >> all right, dan, turn now to the devastating diagnoses that silenced linda ronstadt. she's had a decade-long battle with parkinson's disease. ♪ i've looked all my life >> she's been singing all her life, but now that golden voice has been silenced. ♪ when will i hide below once known as the highest paid woman in rock, she has parkinson's disease and can no longer sing. ♪ i'm going back someday come what may to blue bayou ♪ songs like blue buy you and you're no good helped ka that put her career that won her 11 grammys. she spoke to aarp magazine saying parkinson's is hard to diagnosis. when i went to a neurologist and he said, oh, you have parkinson's disease, i was completely shocked. i wouldn't have suspected that in a million, billion years. diagnosed eight months ago, she's been experiencing symptoms for eight years. originally attributing the inability to sing to a tick bite, and her quivering hands to a shoulder operation. she announced her retirement in 2011 and focused her life on her two child
's martha raddatz is tracking all of this on the ground in amman, jordan. good morning, martha. >> reporter: good morning, george and elizabeth. this region is bracing for a possible military attack on syria, which could come soon. this morning potential targets have been identified, allies consulted, and military commanders await only the green light to launch attacks. these images seen around the world have had a profound effect in washington. secretary of state john kerry saying in no uncertain terms that what the assad regime has done will not go unpunished. >> make no mistake, president obama believes there must be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. >> reporter: for kerry the attacks seemed personal. >> as a father, i can't get the image out of my head of a man who held up his dead child, wailing while chaos swirled around him. >> reporter: while the administration is convinced a chemical attack occurred, the u.n. is proceeding with its investigation. those inspectors who came under sniper fire donning bul
. martha: bye, everybody. jenna: we start off with a fox news alert and a state of emergency declared in egypt today. the acting egyptian government announced this will last one month and be in effect across that country. what that means, the armed force, the military is now ordered to help enforce security. this is following violence as police moved in to break up those camps that have been supporting the former president who is aligned with muslim brotherhood. his name, mohammed morsi. we're getting reports of dozens killed, not only protesters but also police as well as more reports of christians being targeted inside that country. a live report from the middle east moments from now. >>> first right now, brand new stories and breaking news. jon: a disaster for ups to tell you about. one of its cargo planes crashing just outside of the airport in birmingham, alabama. there were no survivors. >>> a zoom ba instructor at center of a prostitution scandal in maine is back in court. what a lex sis wright is doing now. >>> hollywood star power making emotional plea. what they want may pre
martha: man bitten by wolf? bill: yeah. martha: woman swimming with whales. very active show today, like "national geographic" today. bill: i will be in washington tomorrow. you're in new york on stand by for anything that happens. martha: i will be on bill o'reilly tonight. "happening now" starts right now >> i have a dream. jon: five decades after dr. martin luther king, jr. spoke at the lincoln memorial, president obama and other dignitaries will stand on the same steps to commemorate the march on washington, the same steps where dr. king delivered his "i have a dream" speech to a quarter of a million people and thousands are expected to gather there today. we will have much more on today's events throughout our time on the air. >> top story now. a fox news alert. preparations for a strike on syria. right now u.s.-led air or missile strikes, they're looking all but certainty point. the timing is still unclear but the obama administration is working out we're told all the details. the u.n. security council, set for a showdown. and britain is saying it will put forward a resolutio
. >> coverage in the middle east, here in the united states, as well. starting with martha raddatz in the region, tracking all of the latest from jerusalem right now. good morning, martha. >> reporter: good morning, george. the u.s. has a slew of evidence about this chemical attack, including intercepted conversations between syrian commanders. the u.s. and its allies have had massive surveillance operations, aimed at syria, since the conflict began. focusing especially on its chemical weapons stockpiles, which contains hundreds of tons of mustard and sarin gas. satellite have been monitoring whatever possible. abc news has learned that part of the intelligence the u.s. has gathered in the apparent chemical attack of august 21st, came from just such an intercept, one with a syrian commander. foreign policy reports that one panicked call was between an official at the syrian ministry of defense, and the leader of a chemical weapons unit. this evidence, coupled with the horrific images, interviews with survivors and the doctors who treated them, is what has convinced the u.s. at the highest level,
so much. >>> and we turn, now, to the rising tensions in egypt. our global affairs anchor, martha raddatz, joining us from cairo with an abc news exclusive. an interview with the leader at the center of the crisis, the country's new prime minister. we say good morning to you, martha. >> reporter: good morning, lara. this interview comes right as they arrested more members of the muslim brother mid, which could mean more bloodshed. more than 1,000 supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi, now dead. and now, this morning, almost all of the senior leadership of his muslim brotherhood, in custody. including the spiritual leader, carted away by egyptian security. egypt's prime minister told me, the leader was inciting violence. >> there are some accusations that he was talking, provoking hatred. >> reporter: but the prime minister acknowledged the brutal crackdown could mean prolonged bloodshed, which is exactly what worries america, in a country, an ally that's been vital to the stability of this region. are you worried that the muslim brotherhood is going to radicalize? that this
fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support system that enables him to volunteer his time and talents to run the revolution is clearly critical. first, a farm manager, who during most literal revolution is a distant cousin of washington. \washington. then
as the the city tries to get back to normal. abc's martha raddatz is there. >> so where does this go from and were you shot? >> yeah. >> reporter: we speck oke to 25-year-old mohamed sultan shot last week by egyptian forces in the eruption of violence he represents egypt's future, best and brightest, graduating from the united states's ohio state university. >> if we have to die so the next generation can live freely so be it. >> reporter: weeks ago we walked amongst jubilant protesters in the square. across town, with the pro-morsi crowd, building tents and digging in, there was hope for a peaceful end. instead, the egyptian security forces demolished this tent city, killing hundreds of people. on the very same spot we were just weeks ago, the scene is truly stunning. burned out buildings, very few people walking around and so much rubble. this is fast becoming a simmering civil war. one of america's great allies in this region, awash in blood. on one side, the government admitted that 36 islamists in its custody were killed. while on the other, militants slaughtered two dozen egyptian police. th
to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapon. here's abc's martha raddatz. >> reporter: it is a terrible and urgent task, the u.s. and u.n. racing to find out whether chemical weapons killed these men, women and children. and just how many died. a shocking new number from opposition groups revealed in washington. >> the most recent estimates we have seen range from 1,000 to 1,800 which is obviously a broad range. >> reporter: the assad regime says claims that it carried out a chemical attack are baseless. but the world its reacting swiftly and forcefully. as u.n. investigators beg for access to the site, the evidence may be quickly dissipating. president obama has directed the intelligence community to do everything possible to gain additional information about this suspected attack, but we don't know what the u.s. response would be. martha raddatz, abc news, cairo. >> the threat of more political violence hangs over egypt with muslim brotherhood calling for a day of protests. this follows the the release from prison of former president hosni mubarak. the 85-year-old is being held under
chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz. >> reporter: the pictures are gut wrenching. the rebels fighting the regime say these are mothers, fathers, children, killed while they slept in their homes in a damascus suburb. they say the syrian regime fired rockets on its own people. rockets carrying poisonous gas, leaving the innocent convulsing, foaming at the mouth, suffocating. >> i would be very surprised if it turned out to be a fake. >> reporter: images are impossible to verify for certain and the assad regime denies the attack saying allegations are baseless. but we showed the pictures to a weapons expert. >> the only explanation i can really see to this is this looks like this fellow's nerves have been, are being destroyed potentially by something like sarin. >> reporter: the white house said it is "deeply concerned." but the white house has said that before. almost a year to the day. president obama warning syria about crossing a red line. >> we have communicated no -- in no uncertain terms with every player in region that is a red line for us. >> reporter: but t
against its own people. abc's martha raddatz has been reporting all week from the region and she joins us from cairo now. good morning, martha. >> reporter: good morning, george. the u.s. is more convinced than ever before that this was a chemical attack and it is now up to president obama to decide what to do. the images, the evidence gathered in the attack have prompted this morning the u.s. secretary of state to issue the strongest statement to date, john kerry, saying the u.s. has very little doubt that a chemical weapon was used by the syrian regime last week killing hundreds or as many as a thousand syrian civilians. in the region this morning, possible options for a response are being discussed. the u.s. chairman of the joint chiefs and head of central command holding meetings with counterparts from across the region in amman. u.s. navy destroyers and submarines are now positioned in the mediterranean sea armed with cruise missiles ready to carry out strikes inside syria if the president orders them. fighter jets are at the ready, as well, although the jets themselves would not cro
, a continuing resolution to fund the government expiring -- martha, i'm wondering if you can talk about what the obama administration is proposing in early childhood, what the administration is wanting to see , and maybe how they are working to get congress to take up these issues when it is hard to get funding bills going at this point. >> one thing to be clear -- the cuts in headstart and sequestration in general were very much not the administration's plan. you're very much trying to put ourselves on a path to reverse that. moreover, our plan for early education is very much one of investment. investment in head start, not only making sure that programs can keep up with the cost of inflation and not have to make choices that were described, but also to build out a new early head start childcare partnership so some of the best things about head start can be brought to the broader childcare subsidy system and we can raise the quality of early childhood for those infants and toddlers. we have proposed a large investment in home visiting, which is in place right now, but the money is temporar
martha: the guy might have walked into dixon's car. bill: that is tough way to prove your point. martha: we missed you. we'll see "happening now" right now. bill and i will being back tomorrow. jon: we begin with this fox news alert on three major developing stories, each with the potential to take a dramatic turn at any moment. first, our defense secretary chuck hagel just outlined the framework under which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, buste
, speaking in martha's vineyard were the obama's are on vacation. chris toensing, talk about the u.s. response. well, i think there's been quite muted, although it has been described by the washington post and elsewhere as a condemnation, was not a very sharp condemnation i think in the clip that you played from secretary john kerry at the outset of this story here. i think the second sentence of his mouth was that he called on both sides to exercise restraint and to pull back from the brink of constipation. -- consternation. that is a way of inflicting the blame should fall squarely on the shoulders of the military junta. >> i want to go to what john kerry said yesterday. >> today's events are deplorable and they run counter to egyptian aspirations for peace, inclusion, and genuine democracy. egyptians inside and outside of the government need to take a step act. they need to calm the situation. they need to avoid further loss of life. we also strongly oppose a return to a state of emergency law, and we call on the government to respect a sick human rights including freedom, peace
is enjoying the last few hours of vacation on martha's vineyard. hoechbs the links. yesterday he played a round of golf with comedian larry david. the president returns to washington tonight. >>> tomorrow, south african olympic printer oscar pistorius will be indicted. he's charged with murdering his girlfriend who would have turned 30 on monday. as cnn's robyn curnow reports, both sides are bracing for a long trial in a case that captured the attention of the world. >> hi, i'm reva. >> reporter: she was one of south africa's top models and on monday she would have turned 30. >> here it comes. >> reporter: august 19th, instead marked by a return of court for her boyfriend oscar pistorius. the second appearance since being granted bail in february. the olympic star is charged with the premeditated murder. he said it was a tragic mistake. he heard noises and thought she was an intruder. the state says it was intentional. and after a two-month delay, the prosecution says the investigation is finished and their indictment is ready. so now on monday we start to get an indication of which of
-day vacation on martha's vineyard where he played six rounds of golf. that sounds like fun to me. let's hope a few unattended matters don't spoil his mood as he returns to the oval office. first egypt does appear to be falling apart. he might think about that a bitp and actually do something. syria, besides cut off aid, if he has, but which he denies so we don't know. but we'll learn more i'm sure in time. and syria, where he wanted to get the heck out of there. the syrian mess is worsening. the death toll at more than 100,000. no prospects of any kind of negotiated peace. and no one's been held accountable, of course, in the benghazi scandal, the terrorist attack which four americans died, more than 11 months ago. secretary of state kerry says everything is for state department officials who have been placed on paid administrative leave and reassigned and unemployment. this is his order, not ours, because this would be my number one, unemployment. unemployment rates did rise in 28 states last month. we need to get this great vibrant free enterprise capitalist economy going. mr. president, y
to drive around. >> reporter: martha and her family had to make a decision, what to save. >> we had to take all our medication. i'm diabetic, and we had to get the cats, weird things that i did, trying to be optimistic, which i should not have been. >> evacuating is stressful. if you leave for an evacuation, you're just sitting there doing nothing worrying about what's happening to your house. >> reporter: goebels chose to stay to protect his home. >> i went out when i smell the smoke and found people to see what was happening, and from what they knew it didn't look like it was going to be a problem unless the win really picked up. >> reporter: but the wind did pick up, and the fire made goebels' choice a necessity. >> i had to stay. the fire was surrounding us, and we were forced to wait for the fuel to burn up enough to allow us to get out. >> reporter: the fire was within a few feet of geobels's house. >> i didn't sleep for 46 hours. >> i always felt that i would be okay because the firefighters, maybe i'm like a 12-year-old, but they're heroes. this time i'm like, i felt i was left to d
by defense attorneys in the courtroom. here now to tell us what happened, martha -- you interviewed john roberts covering a trial for us. what did the attorneys do? >> basically the defense attorneys tried to pick apart this woman's credibility. they are saying because she takes different drugs for psychological issues that her credibility is in question. they say she misidentified elkins after the first time she identified him. the fact is -- and this is what the judge brought to everyone's attention -- it doesn't matter if this woman is a perfect mother or a monster. what's happening is these young men are being held on trial for the murder of this child. it's all about the murder of the child. >> is there any dispute about the eyewitness testimony that elkins shot the baby? >> not so far. the first defense witness was called today. 21-year-old of the woman. >> is there more than the woman who saw elkins shoot the baby? >> two witnesses. one said she had trouble seeing over the bushes. it's the mother's story. >> that's why they are trying to slime the mother. elkins said he didn't do
this one. we're talking to the guys of one direction next. first let's check in with martha. how are you? what's coming up at the top of the hour? >> thank you so much. coming up at the top of the hour, it's good to see you. bill is in d.c i'm here in new york. we obviously are going to be on top of the serious story, what will the president decide to do? is a shot across the bow the wisest move here? we'll talk to a woman who spent a lot of time on the ground in syria advising u.s. senators about what to do. we'll see you coming up at the top of the hour [ male announcer ] even ragu users a. chose prego traditional over ragu traditional. prego?! but i buy ragu. [ thinking ] i wonder what other questionable choices i've made. [ pop muzak plays ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of r♪lief ] ♪ i've got something for you too. (announcer) fancy feast delights with cheddar. a meal that is sure to delight your cheese lover. now available in the classic form she loves. fancy feast. the best ingredient is love. >> gretchen: quick headlines now. familie
. earlier this week, prime minister beblawi told martha raddatz he would like to see mubarak get a fair and legal trial. >> i hate that any one was not given a fair chance before his normal charge. >> reporter: mubarak's release could ignite further tensions in a country struggling to maintain stability. >> this is horrible. it will cancel everything we have been through. all the killings. all the bloodshed. it's deaf -- it's devastating. >> reporter: more than 1,000 people have been killed across egypt over the past week. in cairo, government forces tried to downplay the violent images that shock the world. what would you say to americans about egypt and about egypt's security forces? >> i invite them to come to egypt and see government forces trying to secure the country against terrori >> reporter: the white house se bd notmt a wints w the karen travers, abc news. >> karen, tha hemwonen, tha the u.n. is urging inspectors that they be allowed in damascus neighborhoodat a supposedlyt the security council meets here in new york today to consider further action. toll from the attack coul
sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at the department of health and human services. >> i'm michael duncan managing director for economic policy at the center for american progress where my work focuses on the federal budget, deficits and debt. >>
sequestration. >> i'm martha covan the associate director for -- office of manage and budget which is part of the executive oversee the budget of a number of federal agencies including education, the administration for children and families at hhs where the head start program is. >> hi cay within the department hhs hhs and i started my early childhood career twenty years ago in a head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. i'm sharon from the center on budget and policy priorities. where i'm the vice president of budget policy and economic opportunity. this is a second go around for me at the center budget and friar returning in november, i worked for secretary inteel yous -- inteem use. >> i'm the manager director my work mostly focuses on the federal budget, deficits, and debt. >> great. i was wondering for we could start with you. we heard the numbers that have been mentioned in introduction about the over 57,000 slots that vitamin be lost. i wonder if you might be able to drill down a little bit more to that. i know, that the office of head start has some addit
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